Topic 7 – Automata

1) The Turing test is a measure of determining whether a machine can demonstrate human intelligence in thoughts, words, or actions. (http://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/turing-test.asp#ixzz4fyQ7hQXP) The Turing test is deemed successful if more than 30% of the judges, after five minutes of conversation and interaction, consider the computer to be human. This test highly relates to automation because if a Turing test is successful, then it can be concluded that the machine or program can run by itself. If a program can run automatically, it can be used to help users to improve their experience, whether shopping, banking or searching the internet.

Conversely, there are many arguments against the Turing Test and that Automation has many negative aspects. Critics believe that true human intelligence lies within the nerve cells that make up the our brains, not a programming code, therefore a machine will never be sophisticated enough to have a mind of its own. (http://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/turing-test.asp#ixzz4fyS9cDWB) Whilst automata seems like a fantastic idea, it still poses many risks to users in terms of accuracy and security.

2) If used correctly, there is no doubt that virtual agents can provide high quality service on the web. When used correctly, they can be used to provide further information, asked FAQ’s or other important questions. However, through personal experience, I know I very very rarely click on these agents in the fear of a scam or virus occurring. Whilst this is a very conservative approach, I don’t think that it is unreasonable. On particular websites, and depending on what the purpose of the website/agent is, they may be appropriate but others may not be so relevant. If used correctly and executed well, agents can definitely provide high service but when they haven’t been used correctly, it is intact the complete opposite.

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Reference list:
Turing Test Definition | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/turing-test.asp#ixzz4fyQ7hQXP

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